Route 1, Box 452            
Port Orchard, Washington
 

General Manager
THE KELLOGG COMPANY
Battle Creek, Mich.

      Dear Sir;

      For many a year I have been grossly annoyed by the packaging proclivities of the manufacturers of prepared cereals and, I have reason to believe, I am only one among millions with the same complaint.

      However, it has always been a maxim of mine never to criticize unless something better can be suggested. Accordingly, I generated an idea which might or might not be of interest to you.

      Every morning, millions of Americans groggily seat themselves at their breakfast table and stare stupidly at the cereal box while stoking themselves with the contents. The cereal box is the fixture of the breakfast table and ranks with ham and eggs in Americanism. But when the consumer begins to imbibe the contents he is also imbibing the intelligence printed upon the box. He reads everything on it. Because it is the brightest thing on the table it commands and gets his attention even though it has nothing to either show or say beyond the lauding of the contents. As the consumer is already oversold on everything under the sun, he cares very little about the advertising.

      Some time ago––and perhaps still––you ran a sort of continued story on one of your cereal boxes. But this was a rather wide idea because it is a long time between boxes. Then you had some very short sketches of this and that, but these too were most inadequate.

      You labor under the fixation that only children eat cereal and so you plaster the box with subchild objects. It is to be doubted if children form a fifth of the consumers of prepared cereals, and, even if you must still slant toward the child, you can bracket the work to miss the elder eater less widely.

      To the point then: you should have something which bears repetitious inspection. Neither continued story, short story nor the lives of great men can answer this test. Once read they are finished and, when the consumer must read them three mornings in a row, they are irksome. Especially are they a source of annoyance to the elder on the third morning because, initially, they were designed wholly for children.


 




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